latest news from the garden

IMG_6810In the beginning of the spring, I was so hopeful that the garden would be producing enough vegetables to feed us for the year.  Quite a few of the results are in and thanks to a cool, wet spring and a hot, humid summer (all above the norm), we would go hungry if the garden was our main source of vegetables.  So many plants did not come close to expectations.  Just about all of my squash plants rotted away from the moisture and the sole survivor has yet to produce a single squash that did not rot.  Eggplants are struggling, barely producing and so are the peppers.

Having no choice but to remove my tacky string fence to keep out the deer, I have had to watch my 20 tomato plants get munched away.  While they are still trying to set fruit, almost none of them have except for a few.  The Gold Berries are one of the only plants producing fruit.

IMG_6811These are small cherry tomatoes, about an inch in diameter and they are a little on the tart side.  The color is what I really love; that brown blush at the top, so unusual and so pretty!

IMG_6815The color develops as the fruit grows rather than as it ripens.  In technical terms, the color is on the “shoulders” of the fruit.  Whatever you prefer to call that area, the seeds are available from my favorite source of heirloom seeds, Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds.

IMG_6816One of the only other plants with fruit is the Chocolate Pear.  What happened to these fruits is a mystery.

IMG_6830Garlic chive blossoms are so delicate but beware, if you let them flower, they will reseed and you will have chives everywhere.  Honeybees like them so I am leaving these flowers in place, yes, I like to live dangerously and I ain’t afraid of plucking plants…

IMG_6823While wandering the garden, I was surprised to find a Charentais melon.  Unlike the squash plants, the melons in my front bed have been sprawling out.  With any luck, we will get more than one.

IMG_6824Near the Charentais is another variety called Golden Crispy.  Having never had one, I cannot tell you anything about it but we have several fruits on the vine and I will have to wait patiently for them to mature.

IMG_6820If you take a moment to look in all of the carrots and parsley, you will find swallowtail caterpillars.  Lots of them actually, probably about two dozen or so out there now.  We have a variety of swallowtail butterflies that visit the garden; zebra, tiger and spicebush swallowtails are abundant but these are zebra swallowtail caterpillars.

IMG_6827The biggest surprise of the day was spotting this monarch caterpillar on a swamp milkweed plant.  In the two years we have been gardening out front and with all of the butterfly plants we have added, we have seen so few monarchs.  Finding this caterpillar was like winning the lottery!

IMG_6829The abundant milkweed plants have also attracted this milkweed leaf beetle.  They look a little like a monster sized ladybug and mainly eat the leaves of the plant.

IMG_6825This butterfly weed, which is a native variety of milkweed, has set seeds and will soon explode and release them into the wind.

IMG_6826One of my favorite plants, Ironweed.  It too is a butterfly magnet, and I just love the color of the flowers.  When we had our home in Nashville, I planted Ironweed on a slope in the yard and it spread by reseeding.  With some luck, this will spread as well.

IMG_6828And another one of my favorites for attracting butterflies, Joe Pye Weed.  If you have an area that gets a lot of moisture and would like to try a rain garden, Joe Pye Weed can tolerate moist soil, a win-win!

As the season progresses, I will be sure to share more from the garden, stay tuned!